App Store Pre-Submission Test

iphoneBefore you submit your iPhone application to Apple, you can use this checklist to see if there are possible reasons for rejection. Take the test by answering all the questions. If you get the green light on every answer, you will have a major chance of getting your app approved. If you have one or more red lights, your app is likely to be rejected.

If your app has been rejected for a reason not in our list: please let us know on info [a] makayama . com and we will add it.

 

By taking the test, you are bound by the Terms of Use at the bottom of this page.


1) Does your app sometimes crash?

Your app may be rejected. Make sure you thoroughly test your application on iPhone and iPod touch in addition to the iPhone Simulator. A large percentage of applications are rejected due to various types of crashes, including crashes on launch, which would have been found and dealt with if they'd been tested on an actual device. Don't skip that step in the development process.
Test passed. Move on to question 2.

2) Does your app become slow or unresponsive after using it for a while?

Your app may be rejected. Memory leaks are a major cause of slugginess in an iPhone app. Test your app with the Instruments tool in X-Code to find possible memory leaks.
Test passed. Move on to question 3.

3) Is all the functionality you describe in iTunes Connect, available in the app?

Test passed. Move on to question 4.
You're now allowed to oversell your app, or to disable core functionality. Core functionality encompasses the belief that customers rightfully expect all the features described in the marketing text to work as described, and likewise that all the buttons and menu items within the application will be fully functional (i.e., no grayed out buttons or notifications that a feature will be implemented later).

4) Does you app show price information?

Do not display the price of an application inside your app or in your application description. The very reasonable explanation for this is that App Store prices/currencies vary from country to country.
Test passed. Move on to question 5.

5) Do your app keywords differ from your apps functionality?

The keywords you enter for your application in iTunes Connect have to be relevant, as Apple sees it. If your app is about football, don’t use a basketball keyword just because you think there’s an overlap in the demographics. And don’t use trademarked words, e.g. ESPN, or names of other App Store apps.
Test passed. Move on to question 6.

6) Is your app's binary name equal to, or an abbreviated form of the name in iTunes Connect?

Test passed. Move on to question 7.
You should create a name for your app that will be consistent with what customers see on the App Store and how it appears on their device. If your app’s name in iTunes Connect is, for instance, “Coraline’s Creative Cajun Cooking,” good choices for short names for devices might be “CreativeCajun,” or “CajunCooking” or “Coraline’s,” which directly evoke the long name, but not “Good Eats,” “Louisiana,” or “Comfort Food,” which do not.

7) Does you app contain hidden functionality or "Easter Eggs"?

If you want to add an innocuous Easter Egg to your application for that purpose, just use the Demo Account Field to let the review team know the unlocking steps. Apple considers this information confidential and will not reveal those steps or their existence. On the other hand, not telling the review team about an Easter Egg in your code in order to circumvent the review process is not allowed. When its existence becomes known, as it inevitably will, Apple's first step will be to remove the offending application from the App Store.
Test passed. Move on to question 8.

8) Does your app contain artwork (pictures, icons, etc.) which are Apple copyrighted?

Ensure that you have the rights to all content used within you app, including code, icons, images, music, and the overall concept. If your content is questionable Apple will require proof of ownership.
Test passed. Move on to question 9.

9) Does your app contain artwork (pictures, icons, etc.) which are copyrighted by others and which you have not cleared with the copyright holders?

Ensure that you have the rights to all content used within you app, including code, icons, images, music, and the overall concept. If your content is questionable Apple will require proof of ownership.
Test passed. Move on to question 10.

10) Does your app, app description or keywords in iTunes Connect, contain brand names, names of well known public figures, registered trademarks or other trademarked material, not cleared with the trademark holder?

Ensure that you have the rights to all content used within you app, including code, icons, images, music, and the overall concept. If your content is questionable we will require proof of ownership. The name and likeliness of public figures are also considered copyrighted.
Test passed. Move on to question 11.

11) Does your app contain music or video (songs, lyrics, TV, film, etc.) which are copyrighted by others and which you have not cleared with the copyright holders?

Ensure that you have the rights to all content used within you app, including code, icons, images, music, and the overall concept. If your content is questionable Apple will require proof of ownership.
Test passed. Move on to question 12.

12) Does your app make use of private libraries, not defined in the SDK?

You may only use APIs which Apple has cleared for public use. Although it is technically possible to use private libraries, it is not permitted and will lead to rejection of your app. Apple has recently started to crack down on private API usage, with an automated tool, which can detect the use of forbidden APIs. So there's no escape from Alcatraz possible anymore. Private APIs include such things as the proximity sensor, realtime camera sensor data, deep level iTunes library access and some networking functionality.
Test passed. Move on to question 13.

13) Does your app use undocumented features of the SDK?

Not only are you restricted to use just public APIs, also undocumented features are forbidden. All the objects, classes, functions, methods etc. that you use, must be described in the official WWDC documentation on the Apple website. If it's not there, you're not allowed to use it.
Test passed. Move on to question 14.

14) Does your app warn the user in case there's no data connection, when accessing the internet?

Test passed. Move on to question 15.
If your application connects to the network, it's important that you provide the appropriate error messages when the network is not present. See the Reachability iPhone program sample which demonstrates the use of the System Configuration Reachability API to detect the absence of WiFi and Wireless Wide Area Network (WWAN) services, so that you can notify your users that a network connection is not available. Your application can then take appropriate action at the first point where network services are required.

15) Does your app comply with the Human Interface Guidelines?

Test passed. Move on to question 16.
The Human Interface Guidelines are a set of design principles that form the foundation of every iPhone application. Apple have posted a document that learns you how to follow those principles as you design an iPhone user interface and user experience. The guidelines are mandatory, if you break the rules, you risk getting kicked from the App Store. They can be found here

16) Does your app's interface look like the UI of native apps from Apple?

Although you're required to follow Apple's design guidelines, you're not allowed to create apps that resemble native iPhone apps too much. For example you can't use coverflow (or mimic it).
Test passed. Move on to question 17.

17) Does your app duplicate functionality from native apps on the iPhone/iPod?

Apple doesn't want you to create apps that provide similar functionality as native apps because they could 'create confusion'for the user. For example Google Voice was rejected because it resembled the native dialer app. A podcast app was rejected because it resembled the iTunes app.
Test passed. Move on to question 18.

18) Is your 512 pixel icon in Itunes Connect the same as your 57 pix icon in the binary?

Test passed. Move on to question 19.
If the artwork is different, your app will be rejected.

19) If the app shows a webpage, is it active?

Test passed. Move on to question 20.
Make sure the page is live when the app is in review. Page Not Found = App Not Approved

20)Is the version number of your app 1.0 or higher?

Test passed. Move on to question 21.
You can't have beta numbering in your app. For example 0.9 will cause rejection.

21) Does your app charge users for additional functionality outside the App Store?

Apple wants 30% of every transaction. If you offer your app for free and charge for it outside the app store, you violate the rules.
Test passed. Move on to question 22.

22) Is your app a time limited trial version?

Time trials are not allowed, if they completely disable the app's use. Also restrictions such as limiting the number of runs are not allowed. Apps should have core functionality that does not expire. However, you can use In App purchase to let certain features expire and then charge to unlock these again.
Test passed. Move on to question 23.

23) Does your app use unauthorised hardware accessories?

All hardware accessories must be authorised by Apple
Test passed. Move on to question 24.

24) Does your app contain material that may be considered pornographic, racist, political, obscene or offensive?

Your app will be rejected. It may not be racist, ridicule public figures, contain prolonged graphic or sadistic violence, or offer graphic sexual content and nudity.
Test passed. Move on to question 25.

25) Does your app contain a runtime, plugins, or interpreted code layer?

An Application may not itself install or launch other executable code by any means, including the use of a plug-in architecture, calling other frameworks, other APIs or otherwise. No interpreted code may be downloaded or used in an Application except for code that is interpreted and run by Apple's Documented APIs and built-in interpreter.
Test passed. Move on to question 26.

26) Does your app use excessive vibration or backlight?

It is not permitted to use continuous vibration in your apps - short bursts as warnings is all that is allowed. Don’t bother trying to set up a timer to keep the vibration going, it will cause your app to be rejected.
Test passed. Move on to question 27.

27) Does your app use the appropriate keyboard type?

Test passed. Move on to question 28.
If your app asks for a phone number or other numeral-only input and you present a keyboard that also includes the possibility of entering standard alpha-numeric input … yep.

28) Are your tableviews correct?

Test passed. Move on to question 29.
If you let a user highlight a row in order to select something or initiate an action, you’d better make darn sure that row is DEselected by the time the tableview is displayed again. Want to keep that row selected as a ‘feature’ (perhaps to remind the user which item they last selected)? Not if you want your app to be approved by Apple, you don’t!

29) Does your app use 'excessive' data over 3G networks?

If your app streams video or allows a user to download large files, it may be rejected for excessive data usage over the cellular network. The app should be limited to WiFi-use only.
Test passed. Move on to question 30.

30) Does your app require capabilities, such as radio, GPS or compass, not supported by the hardware for which it was submitted (for example on an iPod Touch)?

Make sure that your app supports the limited functionality of the iPhone Touch or iPhone 2G when submitting your app. For example, the iPhone Touch does not have GPS, and no cellular radio. The iPhone 3GS is the only device with a compass.
Test passed. Move on to question 31.

31) Does you app contain very limited functionality, for example do nothing more than open a webpage?

In the beginning of the App Store it was not uncommon to see apps that simply opened a web view to a company’s web site. The goal was to get traffic to the web site, with the idea that competing with a few hundred apps was much easier than competing with millions of other web sites. Those apps are rejected nowadays.
Test passed. Move on to question 32.

32) Does your app effect the privacy of your users?

If you collect any user information and that data is sent to a server then you need to explain to the user what is about to happen and give an option to opt out. This applies for example to a user's address and phone number, but also to highscore and leaderboards. And even if the information submitted is just a bogus name that the user enters specifically for this purpose.
Test passed. Move on to question 33.

33) Does your app make covert recordings of sound, video or take covert pictures?

In particular, a reasonably conspicuous audio, visual or other indicator must be displayed to the user as part of the Application to indicate that a Recording is taking place.
Test passed. Move on to question 34.

34) If your app medical?

You must fulfill any applicable regulatory requirements, including full compliance with all applicable laws, regulations, and policies related to the manufacturing, marketing, sale and distribution of Your Application in the United States, and in particular the requirements of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ("FDA").
Test passed. You can now submit your app to Apple. And start praying.

Terms of Use

This agreement (the "Agreement") is entered into by and between you ("you") and Makayama Media B.V., ("Makayama") regarding your use of all aspects of the App Store Checklist (the "Service"). By using the Service, you consent to be bound by these terms and conditions as well as Makayama's general Terms of Service.

The Service is designed to help you check iPhone & iPod application compatibility with the App Store which is not owned or controlled by Makayama. In particular, the Service provides brief descriptions of admission criteria to help you identify the criteria of interest to you. Makayama does not guarantee or can be held liable for app rejections or admission, or any other consquence of using the information on this webpage.

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